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In this episode of the Farm Equipment Used Equipment Remarketing Roadmaps podcast, brought to you by Agrisolutions, hosts Casey Seymour and Aaron Fintel sit down with Stacy Anthony from the Kentucky-based AGCO dealer Ag Revolution

Casey and Aaron get a “boots on the ground” perspective from Stacy  about the used planter equipment market in their region and how younger farmers approach the business compared to the older generations.

Casey and Aaron also continue their discussion with Stacy Anthony about Ag Revolution’s market and a younger generation of farmers taking over operations.

 
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Farm Equipment‘s podcast, Used Equipment Remarketing Roadmaps, is brought to you by Agrisolutions.

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Agrisolutions is the market leader in wearable parts, components, accessories and solutions for tillage, seeding, planting, fertilizing, hardware and inventory management solutions. Improve performance and durability with a wide range of in-field and extended life solutions.

To learn more about Agrisolutions and their globally recognized brands, such as Bellota, Ingersoll Tillage and Trinity Logistics, visit Agrisolutionscorp.com.

 

 

Full Transcript

Kim Schmidt:

Hi, I'm Kim Schmidt, executive editor of Farm Equipment. Welcome to Farm Equipment's Used Equipment Remarketing Roadmaps Podcast. In this episode, host Casey Seymour, and co-host, Aaron Fintel, sit down with Stacy Anthony of AgRevolution, a six store AGCO dealer in Kentucky and Indiana. Before we head over to Casey and Aaron, I wanted to thank our sponsor AGRISOLUTIONS.

Kim Schmidt:

Agrisolutions is the market leader in wearable parts, components, accessories, and solutions for tillage, seeding, planting, fertilizing, hardware and inventory management solutions. Improve performance and durability with a wide range of infield and extended life solutions. To learn more about Agrisolutions and their globally recognized brands, such as Bellota, Ingersoll Tillage and Trinity Logistics visit agrisolutionscorp.com. If this is your first time listening, you can subscribe to the podcast on any of your favorite podcast platforms.

Kim Schmidt:

Okay, let's get things going. Here's Casey and Aaron talking with Stacy Anthony, about what they're seeing in the planter market and customer interest in wanting to advance their planters to the next level of [inaudible 00:01:06].

Aaron Fintel:

So in this addition of Boots on the Ground, I got a long time friend, a guy that I've known for a long time in this industry.

Casey Seymour:

He's an old hand in the industry.

Aaron Fintel:

He's been around, yeah. An old Kansas boy. Actually started out kind of the same path that [inaudible 00:01:27] and I went down.

Casey Seymour:

Yup.

Aaron Fintel:

All kind of worked in the same area. So I've Stacey Anthony from AgRevolution. They are the AGCO dealer out there in-

Casey Seymour:

God's Country.

Aaron Fintel:

Yeah. Like Indiana, little bit of Kentucky, in that area, Stace? So Stacy Anthony has been in this industry if you know, if you worked in the used equipment industry, you know Stacy Anthony for a long time. So Stacy, welcome to the show and thanks for being on man.

Stacey Anthony:

Well, thank you, Casey and Aaron. Appreciate it. And listen to your podcast frequently and always appreciate the content and the value you guys bring to the industry. So thank you very much.

Casey Seymour:

We appreciate that, man. Thanks a lot.

Stacey Anthony:

You bet.

Aaron Fintel:

So Stace, give us a little ... let's just start like this. Just how'd you get started in the equipment business and then how'd you get to where you're at now?

Stacey Anthony:

Well, it's a simple story. I grew up on a farm and a ranch in Southwest Kansas. Started out in the sales side of the business. And as you continued to grow up inside of that side of the business, well, I had an opportunity as consolidation started to develop. First, went on with a management job at KGN out in the Colorado locations. And spent some years out there and then had an opportunity to become a minority part owner of a John Deere dealership in Northwest Canada, up around Oakley, Kansas. And spent about 10 years up there.

Stacey Anthony:

And as things continued to migrate and develop in consolidation, one thing led next to another and spent some time at 21st Century and got used to Western Nebraska and part of that country. And later found myself working inside the Brandt's holdings company out of Fargo, North Dakota. And my main job there was to help start and develop and organize the export division, that soon grew to be exporting in about 27 countries. And spent about 12 years there before I accepted a CEO position of MirTech Harvest Center down in the Delta, down in Memphis, Tennessee. Where we kind of a startup rebuild of some cost dealerships there in that area.

Stacey Anthony:

And you know how it goes, one thing always leads to another, but during a, I guess, an exploratory project to see what else we could add to our current line there, ran on some AGCO guys and really began to dig in and try to understand where they're headed with their new ideas and their new vision, and their new leadership. And became quite familiar with the Fendt brand. And we had some light kind chemistry that led us to an opportunity when that opportunity arose here in Kentucky and Indiana, to do a startup company with AgRevolution. We stood up six dealerships last January one. And soon we'll be growing and adding some more, but this is ... it's been a good first year. We've got a really good team of people and we're working hard to develop the full portfolio of AGCO products, but primary focus on Fendt.

Casey Seymour:

It's amazing that this industry's such a small, small world. So I worked ... I didn't realize you worked at [inaudible 00:04:39]. That's a whole nother-

Aaron Fintel:

Yeah, I didn't either.

Casey Seymour:

That's a whole nother loop there of intertwinedness, but I worked with a guy at Prairie Lane. He was our VP of aftermarket or not VP aftermarket, he was ... I don't remember his exact title, but he worked in aftermarket. His name is Benny Ray. And he worked with you up at brand holdings, you know? And so it's just like a small world. You don't realize how intricate things are in this business until you actually sit and start having conversation with people about where they've been at, what they've done. So it's interesting to hear that background, Stacy.

Stacey Anthony:

Yeah. Well, guys like Benny, guys like you two, when you think about how small it is, there's just been a lot of good forged friendships along the way. And even though some of us, at one time we're aligned, sometimes now we're competitors. At the end of the day, we're all friends and that's what makes this thing fun.

Casey Seymour:

That's exactly right.

Aaron Fintel:

Oh, absolutely.

Casey Seymour:

The people side of it, of the used equipment world is fantastic.

Aaron Fintel:

That's the funnest part of it.

Casey Seymour:

Yup. All right. So let's talk a little bit about what's going on here. So on the last moving iron podcast Aaron and I did, we kind of went down and started talking about how things were moving in the market and those kind of things, and what we saw happening. I've let out a few predictions of kind of what I see happening out there. And after we get done recording, there's always about another two and a half hours worth of material that flows in my brain after I stop recording. But there's-

Aaron Fintel:

Per day.

Casey Seymour:

Per day. The one thing that I'm ... I really kind of was thinking a lot about, is, take a look at the plan. We talked about planters for a while and then how they never quite rebounded and to a quote, unquote problem, 14, 15, 16 to auction all those off and we kind of dumped the market. And as the economy kind of was bouncing back up to where it is today, the planter market never really had a big leap forward, to get more planters built and purchased and those kind of things.

Casey Seymour:

And we're going to start seeing that now, as commodity prices come up. We're going to see more and more planters built, but the trade-ins right behind all those are pretty much sold on that. All the way across there. So, I mean, Stace, you take a look what's going on out there around you. What's the planter market like out where you're out there, in that little neck of the woods? And what are you doing different today than you were doing six months ago, as you take a look at that marketplace?

Stacey Anthony:

Well, was specifically related to planters, in our startup company, we were a little bit unique because we didn't buy any used inventory from the seller. And so therefore, we started with zero used inventory. And there was a day when we all would've really liked have been in that [crosstalk 00:07:13].

Aaron Fintel:

Yeah. I was just thinking that Stacy. I'm thinking for most of the 15 years on this side of the fence, that's a great problem to have, but it also really sucks.

Stacey Anthony:

It does right now, for sure. And so basically we started selling new, of course we sold a few new momentum fit, momentum planters, traded in some used ones. Of course they were sold right away. And right now, yeah, we're looking and we're starving for planters. And because we're such limited right now in what we can get access to for this next 12 to 24 months in new planters, we're trying to buy planters. And we're trying to buy tractors and we're trying to buy a lot of different things, but right now, that market is pretty stout and you've got to be really careful in the choices you make, so that you don't get upside down in what you buy and what you sell it for.

Stacey Anthony:

So planters right now, there's a lot of demand. There's a lot of demand for all ages, mostly newer though, I would say. Fresh, clean, newer planters. Some want to put some precision applications on there. Some want to cater them to their own desires, their own needs, but there's a hungry appetite for planters right now for upgrades. And unfortunately, we're just not able to supply all that demand.

Casey Seymour:

When you look at say your customers right now, you talked about the technology side of that. And how many customers do you have that are trying to move from older technology into newer technology? And how many do you have that are saying, "You know what, I'm pretty happy with the way we're going and I'm going to keep the same planter base that I've always had?"

Stacey Anthony:

You know, Casey, I think honestly, 85% of our customers want to step up to some type of technology or advance where they are into another level of technology. And I just don't see that going away. When you look at some of the results of some of this improved technology on these planting units and it all begins there, people realize that. And I just don't see that fading.

Casey Seymour:

Yeah. I would agree with that. More and more people, especially after going past this last five year kind of downturn of the market, a lot of guys are looking at everything they have, whether it's tractors, columbines, whatever it is. They're looking for more technology in whatever they're buying.

Stacey Anthony:

Yeah. If you've got a standard stock Harley Davidson right now, you want a 26 inch front wheel. [ Crosstalk 00:00:09:26] 17 engine and the same way with a planter. Nobody wants a stock planter anymore.

Casey Seymour:

That's right. Right. Yeah. And stock planter anymore is getting to be a pretty heavily technologically loaded machine anyways.

Aaron Fintel:

Oh yeah.

Casey Seymour:

Just the base level machine.

Aaron Fintel:

Yeah, a stock planter now is way advanced compared to a 7,300 on the green side.

Casey Seymour:

And that's something with Stacey's 85%. That is something I remember, man, it would've been '30s traded in on the first dollars. Right. We tried that trade the receiver, trade the display, leave it in the tractor, all that. And we pulled that off for like a couple months and then everybody, "Oh, I don't want to do that. I don't want to do that." Now guys are upset if it doesn't have premium activation in the armrest and this, and then I need an extend monitor and I need this. And

Aaron Fintel:

Yeah. It's amazing how much that's changed.

Casey Seymour:

Yeah. In 10 years you couldn't talk guys into swapping receivers and displays, and now thanks to manufacturers basically impregnating it into the machine, that's the only way they'll go.

Aaron Fintel:

As you look at what's going on there, I mean, like you said, you guys are a startup company. You got the Fendt line that you're carrying. When you're looking at the openness of a new brand coming in to the area, what's been your response to the customers that you've worked with as to welcoming a new quote, unquote vendor back into the territory there, because it's not like there wasn't an AGCO dealer there beforehand. That was a-

Stacey Anthony:

Yeah. Boyd, Cat, and Wayne Supply.

Aaron Fintel:

Boyd. That's right. Yeah. Those guys in there. So that had been an established venture there for a while, but I guess as you come in with a brand new line really, what's been your response from the customer base you're working with?

Stacey Anthony:

Well, I think underneath the Boyd Cat umbrella, most everything was yellow and challenger and how all that aligned with Cat dealers. Right? And so now that they see a transition going on, they see a lot of it going Fendt green. People are intrigued about what's different about it. And I think like in any market, you get people, you get your earlier adopters who are saying, "You know what, I want to take a look. Let me peek in the window, let me have a demo."

Stacey Anthony:

And they want to try to check it out and see what's different about it. And then you got the other guys who are just tried and true, blue, green, yellow, whatever they are. They don't really have an interest in it right now. So what you do, is you end up focusing around those early adopters where you can kind of get your foot planted and get some experience and get some show stoppers going on.

Stacey Anthony:

And that's what we've done. I think we had the most availability with tractors and we got started first of all, with our tractor line, the 900 series and some of the thousand series Fendts in. And we started off pretty good. And the people have had experiences with those tractors, have ran them and they're well pleased. And then we started moving into the momentum planter and testing that, and doing some trial tests and field tests. And that started to go over pretty good.

Stacey Anthony:

So we started selling a few of them and then the ideal combine was introduced. And we started doing some field demonstrations in wheat and then moved on into the fall season, and had a good run on selling some combines there with Fendt Ideal. So there's a lot of this product line and now we're coming out with the new sprayer, got introduced with the new R9. And so with all this future capabilities and things like that.

Stacey Anthony:

So the brand is starting to increase in portfolio. It's starting to widen. And we understand that probably the value of that brand needs to have a wider portfolio because, at the end of the day, there's some guys who'll just buy one or two, but there's still a mud mentality out there. Right? And if you're going to compete with the market leaders and we all know who the market leaders are, you're going to have to be able at some point in time compete in that mud program.

Casey Seymour:

Yeah. Right. Yup. Yup.

Kim Schmidt:

We'll get back to Casey, Aaron, and Stacey in a moment. But first I wanted to pause to thank our sponsor AGRISOLUTIONS. To learn more, visit agrisolutionscorp.com. Now back to Casey and Aaron, as they continue with their discussion with Stacey Anthony about AgRevolutions market and a younger generation of farmers taking over operations.

Casey Seymour:

As a general topic conversation here, what are you seeing out there in your neck to woods right now with retirements and consolidation, on farm consolidation, those kind of things? Are you seeing quite a bit of that now with some guys that are probably, were going to retire two, three years ago, four years ago, something like that? And then the economy kind of turned down, so equity positions and those kind of things were questionable, and now they've kind of gained that back? Are you seeing any kind of a retirement move out your way where some younger generations are getting a little bit bigger or taking over the farm, I guess? So what are you seeing, as far as that goes?

Stacey Anthony:

We're seeing a little bit of both. Not a lot, not a lot right now, but we're seeing two things. One where there is a couple younger generation coming in and taking over current operations. But we've also seen a couple that have just said, "Hey, you know what, I don't have anybody else to take it over." And so the neighbor or whatever has went in there and either increased his size by a third, or a half, or double, or more. And so we've got a little bit of both going on, but I wouldn't say it's a large amount. It's still pretty managed. And probably not as much as it is in another location.

Casey Seymour:

When you're looking at various technologies, when you're starting to see guys and how they approach their buying trade cycles and those kind of things, how much of that have you seen from comparatively to where you started at, when you first started the business to where you're at now, how much have you noticed in trade cycles? How much of that have you seen change over the years?

Stacey Anthony:

Well, I think we see the businessman, right? We've got some guys who just kind of trade whenever they feel like they need it. But we're starting to see more of the businessman start the service. The guy who's really starting to say, "Hey," he's calculating his equity. He's calculating his operational cost. He's calculating the cost of doing business. There's a lot wider, I think breadth of people who actually know what it takes to grow a crop nowadays, and they know what their breakevens are and they're becoming more business minded. And so we're starting to see that become a lot of the conversation that we're having, as we begin to talk about trade cycles.

Casey Seymour:

When you're working with your customers and again, all back from me started where you're at now. I mean, just the amount of data that we're pulling off these machines now and putting that into not only just agronomic decision making, but do you need the size of the tractor that you have? What's it look like if you were to just turn the key off every once in a while and not have so many idle hours? Those kind of things. How are you having those conversations with your customer and what's that looking like?

Stacey Anthony:

Well, I think it's based around utilization. There is a lot more conversations around utilization. I mean, before it was just, I need a tractor to do this job, wanting to do that job, but now it's more about multi-use. And I think we're really going to start having some interesting conversations right here in the very near future, when we start talking about autonomy. Right?

Casey Seymour:

Yeah, exactly.

Stacey Anthony:

I don't don't even know, or we're trying to really forecast and predict, what does that look like? Is that smaller units, more of them, 24/7? I don't know what that exactly looks like, but right now we're all about size and scale and utilization, and big horsepower steals sales. But that could change in the future.

Casey Seymour:

Yeah. You bring up a good point with the autonomous tractor thing. I think about that. I have about a 40 minute drive home and that idea of autonomy comes across my mind a lot more times than it doesn't. And what's that look like? And how is that going to change the way, not only customers buy machine, buy machinery, but how, the way we sell use equipment and what that looks like? And how that whole thing kind of smashes together, because I am a firm believer that when autonomous tractors come around, the idea of a yearly role and those kind of things, especially as machines get smaller and whether or not electric tractors and all those kind of things make their way into it.

Casey Seymour:

The one thing about the autonomous side of it, there's a lot of factors in a piece of equipment that kind of go away. There's a lot less things on there that other than the specific power trains that you have to worry about. So you're really starting to look at what's the technology on the machine, versus what the horsepower rating is and those kind of things. It really is kind of a brave new world of sorts, that you have to step back and take a look at, of how many machines is this guy going to use. And then how functionally long are they going to use those machines, before they decide they want to do something else with them?

Stacey Anthony:

Yeah, I think that's true. And I think it's all going to come down to the economics of the size of that machine and how many they need, and how many they'll utilize. So it's going to be interesting, but it'll come down to an economic decision, I'm sure.

Casey Seymour:

Absolutely.

Aaron Fintel:

Just saying guys, they were having this same discussion a hundred years ago.

Casey Seymour:

Yeah.

Stacey Anthony:

Well, true point.

Aaron Fintel:

We're never getting away from horses.

Casey Seymour:

That's a good point, because that's exactly right. I mean, you read so many of those things about we're never going to get rid of a horse, the society of a tractor is stupid.

Aaron Fintel:

Yeah, my first boss traded for horses.

Casey Seymour:

Really?

Aaron Fintel:

Yeah.

Casey Seymour:

Like when you were working for him?

Aaron Fintel:

No. God, no, man. Heavens, no. When he started out, he was an older guy at that point. And just like ... Kenny's old boss too.

Casey Seymour:

I'm sure. I'm sure Kenny traded for horses.

Aaron Fintel:

No, he was ... it's the guy Kenny worked for.

Casey Seymour:

Oh, wow.

Aaron Fintel:

Because me and Kenny sat in the same office.

Casey Seymour:

Okay.

Aaron Fintel:

No joke. And yeah. I mean, he would tell me in high school, he'd start selling and he'd go sell cream separators and that kind of thing. But he used to tell me, they had it just kind of an X amount and they had a buyer in St. Louis that they'd get them down to St. Louis and they'd ship them down the Mississippi. Trade for horses all day, every day.

Stacey Anthony:

[inaudible 00:19:18] the Ukraine.

Aaron Fintel:

There you go. We got this new agriculture project in Ghana.

Casey Seymour:

Yeah, that's funny. But another thing too on this whole technology side of that. 22 years ago they were having the same conversation about auto studio, RTK and audio studio. And that, [inaudible 00:19:40] rolled out their autonomous tractor thing and you've seen the smart ag deal and you've got the-

Stacey Anthony:

KSIH.

Casey Seymour:

Yeah.

Stacey Anthony:

They're farms how display for years.

Casey Seymour:

Gotten those kinds of things. If you read the comments in that, people are just like, this is never going to really ... I mean, it doesn't really have a place and blah, blah, blah. Same conversations you heard so many years ago.

Casey Seymour:

I mean, Stace, when you're looking at technology adopters in your area, is it still pretty, pretty much that same rule, you got that 20% that are hardcore technology technologists and they want to have the latest and greatest thing out there? And then you've got this 60% somewhere in the middle? And then you've got this other 20% that still wishes they could plant without any kind of guidance? Is that pretty synonymous with your area?

Stacey Anthony:

I'd say it is. I was just thinking back about your earlier conversation. Can you remember when we thought technology was an Accu track, three point guidance system or an navigator back in the day?

Aaron Fintel:

Yeah, exactly.

Stacey Anthony:

We thought that was the edge of cutting edge of technology back, and it was back then. Right?

Casey Seymour:

Right. Yeah.

Stacey Anthony:

But now we've migrate to all this. And I would say Casey, to answer to your question, I would say that probably, yeah. That 20 might even be starting to grow. I think that's going to start to grow, where those cutting edge guys are really going to start to increase to maybe even 30, 35 and here in the next few years to come. But your 20, 60, 20 right now is pretty close.

Casey Seymour:

To kind of wrap this up, Stace. I guess as you take a look at what's going on around you, what are two to three things that you really have on your radar as stuff that you're paying attention to, from a point of concern? And then what are a couple things that you're looking at on your radar, that are very positive thing that you're going to go out and try to grow and expand?

Stacey Anthony:

Well we're going to try to go out and grow and expand just the visibility and awareness of what our product line can do. It's here to compete with. How it can compete. We're going to continue to work really hard on getting the word out on the product and the image, and the demonstration and the performance of it. The things we're concerned, is most like what everybody else is concerned about. But I think, I'm most concerned this year, honestly and I think it could be a very difficult year for some dealers, because I think this year's going to be more challenging than last year, when it comes to availability. I think the fracturing of the supply chain went much deeper than we all thought it did.

Casey Seymour:

Absolutely. Agree.

Stacey Anthony:

I think the fact that we thought by now, looking back this in 2020, we'd be through it and over it by now. And I think we're just, we still, maybe haven't even hit bottom yet. And hopefully what we see as bottom is maybe the beginning of 23 and probably more into 24. And that's a little bit disturbing.

Stacey Anthony:

I think what we see this year as supply chain still struggles, is that, you know what we're really going to have to start the forward forecast and skate in front of that puck a lot further than we ever thought we'd have to. And when you start thinking about planting your order calendar 12 months out. Okay, we were all pretty used to that. 24 and 36, that's a challenge. And that's a concern because right now what's going to happen, is a lot of these tractors and planters are going to miss the delivery dates for this spring. You're going to slide into this summer, this fall.

Stacey Anthony:

Then you're going to ask yourself the question, okay, is the customer still going to take that? And if the question is, well, yeah, I'm going to take it because I don't see supply getting any better. Now you're going to have to ask yourself, well, what are we going to do about the financing part of it, because we got to somehow align with the cash flow stream of these guys still, but we've got kind of, we're off wonky here a little bit, right?

Stacey Anthony:

I mean, we've got deliveries in October. And if you put a payment six months from now and he's making a down payment, well, that could be cash strenuous. And then if you say, "Okay, well, you don't want to come and do 12 months from now because that's right at harvest time." Now you're going to be having conversations with your finance companies or whatever, about an 18 month first pay. And I think that's something we've all got to kind of be ready for.

Aaron Fintel:

Yep. Yeah.

Casey Seymour:

Good point.

Aaron Fintel:

Big time.

Casey Seymour:

That's something I really have not given any thought to. And that's exactly right. Where how all that stuff aligns up with what's going on, because like you said, that cash flow thing is so important when it comes time for payment time, you know what I mean? It makes a big crunch on that stuff. Well Aaron, you got anything else you want to throw in before we shut down?

Aaron Fintel:

I don't think so. I want to thank Stacy for being on. It was terrific. Terrific information.

Casey Seymour:

Yep, good stuff. Stacey, folks want to reach out to you and get more information about AgRevolution or just what's the best way to get a hold of you and see what's going on over there at AgRevolution?

Stacey Anthony:

Well, they can visit our website at AgRev.com. They can always call me at 770-617-4631. Would be glad to connect with them there. And appreciate both of you giving me an opportunity to be on your show today. And thank you for what you do and what you continue to do each and every day.

Casey Seymour:

And I appreciate that, STace. And it's good to catch up, man. It's been a while. It's been too long, man. We got to keep better in touch with each other.

Stacey Anthony:

Let's do that. I promise to do the same.

Casey Seymour:

Right on, man. Well I am Casey Seymour with Moving Iron podcast. You can find me on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. That's where you find the latest additions on the Moving Iron podcast. You can also go to MovingIronLLC.com. And you can find everything Moving Iron related also go to the website there to find all the information for the Moving Iron summit coming up in Nashville, Tennessee. Stacey, you've been going to that for a while. What's your thoughts about going to that Moving Iron summit?

Stacey Anthony:

I think it's well worth the time. I think the content just continues to get better and better. The relationships, the networking. I plan on going. I won't miss it

Casey Seymour:

Right on. Aaron folks, folks want to reach out to you, what's the best way to do that?

Aaron Fintel:

Call me or text me, 308-760-1193. Also pretty active on the Old Ag Twitter at A-A-ron Fintel. And also on the book of faces.

Casey Seymour:

Right on. I am Casey Seymour with Aaron Fintel and Stacey Anthony. Go out and move some iron folks.

Kim Schmidt:

Thanks Casey, Aaron, and Stacy. And thanks to AGRISOLUTIONS for sponsoring this podcast. We've got even more used equipment, remarketing resources that we're sending your way. In addition to this podcast, we're also tapping into Casey's expertise across all our informational channels. Find more from him in the print magazine and on farm-equipment.com/asktheexpert. You can keep up on the latest industry news by registering online to receive our free newsletters, visit www.farm-equipment.com. From Casey and Aaron, as well as our entire staff here at farm equipment, I'm Kim Schmidt. Thanks for listening.

Sound Effects: Jahzzar - Magic Mountain